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Project on Science, Technology and Disability

About Entry Point!

Entry Point! knows that students with disabilities who have demonstrated high motivation, persistence, and achievement in STEM fields are eager to work in science and engineering research and development.  Our mentors work with students on future undergraduate coursework, plans for graduate study, and/or employment.

In addition to offering competitive internships, our partners pay real stipends and provide assistive technology and other reasonable accommodations.  Travel funds and recommendations about accessible housing and transportation may also be provided to students who are relocating for the summer.

Want to know more?

Roadmaps & Rampways chronicles the journeys of three dozen students from childhood to higher education in science, engineering, or mathematics, and on through their early career decisions. Each had a significant disability. Find out more about these students and how they found success.

New Career Paths for Students with Disabilities.  Although the nation has made important progress in helping students with disabilities reach their fullest potential, much more remains to be done at the pre-college and post-secondary education levels – and beyond those into competitive employment.  For those students who choose to pursue STEM fields, quality education can lead to promising technical careers.  AAAS suggest that future disability legislation, policies and initiative focus on five key areas.

Thirty Years of Changing Lives: The AAAS Project on Science, Technology and Disability.  AAAS has a 30-year history of influencing policies, programs, and practices involving people with disabilities in the fields of science, mathematics, engineering, and technology.  This publication documents the changes in legislation, technology, and programs that have influenced the education and career advancement of persons with disabilities in STEM fields.

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